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equalizer in our society. and as we talk about gender equality, gender equality in math and science is such a critical area. and i'm really pleased with such great honorees, but i'm focusing on an amazing, amazing teacher who began over 45 years ago at washington high school. and i think there's a lot of ego pride in our neighborhood. she is an amazing toeholder we are honoring for women's history month. her contribution is in the field of mathematics at washington high school, go back over 40 years. and she is always encouraging and challenging girls and young women to study advanced courses and to consider opportunities in majoring in math and science and going on to really apply their learning. but i think she's -- when i review the different comments about her from less experienced teachers and students, the words that come out are nurturing and supportive and just a really person that brings everyone together as well. one of the events that washington high does is the pie day or pi day. i know in the math department the teachers bring different types of pies. it is an atmospher
women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. >> i want to welcome all of you to this very full house and this wonderful celebration for women's history month to recognize the efforts of women in our great city and county of san francisco. women's history month is a time to appreciate the contributions of our women leaders in our communities who have been courageous in proving the quality of life for all san franciscans. since 1996, the san francisco commission and the department on the status of women ~ has recognized the vital work and contributions of women throughout our community through this program, and i would like to invite dr. emilie morasi who is the executive director of that agency to say a few words about the history of this event. >> thank you very much, president chiu. i am joined today by commissioner kay [speaker not understood]. i'd like to ask her to come on up. she's very familiar with these chambers, having served as clerk for many, many years. and if there are any other commissioners who joined us, please come on up. i have just returned from japan th
in which science and scientists played a central and vital role. the manhattan project, the thousands of physicists and other scientists who developed the atomic bomb was the most dramatic illustration of this, i think probably today almost as well known were the thousands of mathematicians and other sign b terrific work withers in england and washington, d.c. who broke the german e anything ma, cipher and other access codes. the very small group of parish parish -- british and american scientists who really turned the tide in the battle against the u-boats are not so nearly well known at all. but their contribution was, i think, every bit as vital not only in winning one of the most crucial battles in the war against nazi germany, but also for its lasting consequences in revolutionizing the very way military commanders think about war. for that matter, revolution eyeing the way quantitative an access could be apply today a host of practical problems in the business world through the new science patrick plaqueet and his -- blacket and his scientists created during the war, operational
if a big one suddenly heads our way, pray. is a lack of investment in science in space putting civilization at risk? the delightful discovery. the sweet realization that you have a moment all to yourself. well, almost. splenda® no calorie sweetener. splenda® makes the moment yours™. splenda® no calorie sweetener. great first gig! let's go! party! awwwww... arigato! we are outta here! party...... finding you the perfect place, every step of the way. hotels.com i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. let's get a jetta. [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. waiting for your wrinkle cream to work? neutrogen
in forecast, what physics meteorologist and the natural sciences can teach us about economics, physicist explain the ebb and flow of market of economy can relate to science. look for the title in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near too future on booktv and booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's a look at the prime time lineup for tonight. .. now author sara carr explores the results of the state legislature's decision shortly after hurricane katrina to re-assign control over the majority of new orleans public schools to the recovery school district, administered by the state. by following a student, teacher, and a principal as they traverse different segments of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during th
in computer science. he said, come look at my computer lab, i went to his computer lab and he had the big machine and it looked impressive to me. i had a mac at home. he said let me show you something, it's the first time i saw the worldwide web. it showed exhibit and had picture and text. as far as i knew the internet was text. i said, james, if you can have text on the computer why can't we have a newspaper on the web? i said that and he said, well, maybe we should something like that? one thing lead to another and the times started a task force of online. they put out the first website in january '96, i became the first editor of the website. so i changed completely from the traditional journalist to a website journalist, it was quite an education for me. >> do you want know keep going and going? tell me. let me tell you a little bit about the conclusion. i shouldn't tell you too much. i want do you buy the book. [laughter] this is what happened. to have a book like this, you expect that you're going have a know where it comes out. the reporters at the time told me we were going come o
tv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very well documented problems which we have failed as a profession to fix. and so i think we need the help more than anything else of the public. it's sort of a -- mass they are people like nerds and lawyers and d
the same science that brought us dolly the cloned sheep has advanced to the point where scientists might be able to bring them back. the extinction is national geographic story. >> maybe it got frozen somehow, you can use that to create an embryo, you can implant it in a living animal, that egg will become an animal. >> don't expect t-rex with the museum of natural history. >> you have to divide it into stone cold dead, which is what dinosaurs are, they're fossils, and then things that went recently extinct that you may have specimen of what amounts to be the carcass of the animal. >> the extinction happened, in 2003, a team of french scientists brought back a type of mountain goat. the last one died in 1990, but scientists preserved cells and were able to genetically engineer it and it lived ten minutes before dying. while it may be cool to have them back, there are a number of ethical issues. the animal habitat may no longer exist. what happens in this new world of genetics where people pick and choose genetic quality. >> the technology is the same with a passenger pigeon or virus. wha
criminal justice system in one that uses science base, human approaches to help people change their lives which reduces recidivism and breaking the inter generational to return. we hope to transform the criminal justice system on a national basis and what we are learning is san francisco is going to help many other states in its jurisdiction to find other ways to serve justice and at the same time change lives and reduce recidivism. our counties realignment effort which means that if we have individual treatment plans, we look at the individual and create a case plan based upon his or her needs and not taking a one side approach as we know about the terrible result of the state prison system. the recidivism rate was 78 percent. i'm really happy to report that we have proven that the sky has not fallen since realignment. we have major results and i will share those stats with you. we have certain sanctions which included incarceration but also rewards for positive behavior and there is leaders in san francisco was in terms of a legal approach was -- ensuring that due process rights were un
children in the event of a fire in the home. there is an emerging body of science telling us what a lot of us parents already know -- kids sleep more soundly than adults. it can take a lot more to wake them up and smoke alarms may not be a match for a sleeping child. we get our report tonight from our nbc national investigative correspondent jeff rossen. [ alarm ] >> reporter: it's the sound we rely on to wake us up in a fire. but experts say in many cases children will sleep right through a smoke alarm. could that really be true? we set up a test at this house in connecticut. home to the hollander family -- parents michelle and josh and their three boys. we installed infrared cameras in the kids' bedrooms and in the middle of the night had a local fire captain set off the smoke alarm. would they wake up? [ alarm ] >> there it goes. >> reporter: we are watching with their parents on a monitor downstairs. seconds go by. then a minute. then two minutes. the boys keep sleeping. >> this could be a real fire right now. >> they would sleep right through it. it's so scary that the kids can sle
crowded. they posed with their shovels. the mission hall global health science building will house faculty. the staff building is set to be completed next year. the 289 bed medical center is set to open in 2015. >>> president barack obama flew to jordan today. he and kim abdullah made an appearance. they said the confident that the leader would collapse. and that syria could be an onkhraeuf for extremism. after that the president's middle east tour is set to wrap up tomorrow after a viceit to the city of petra. now trending, two georgia teenagers are under arrest in a shocking crime that is drawing national headlines tonight. sherry west says she was approached by the teens yesterday asking for money. she said she did not have any. then she says one of the teens shot her in the leg and then shot and killed her 13-month- old son in a stroller. today, the police announced the rest of a 17-year-old boy and a 14-year-old in this crime. you can find the unedited police news conference on the ktvu web site under the world news tab. >> north dakota lawmakers passed a bill that would end abortions
got my start in salinas. i was there covering the weather. i've always been fascinated by science. whether it was biology, chemistry, you name it. i really became curious and fascinated with the weather. so i tried to audition with couple of other people to try to do weather for the night shows. next thing you know i was on the air. i enrolled in meteorology program and got my soe society seal of approval and national weather association seal. i landed in san francisco, my dream job and here i am. that is what our weather team sets us apart. we've been here. we know the area. we know the topography and for people that are newcomers forecasting, if you haven't been here, if you don't have the experience behind you, nine times out of ten you are going to get it wrong. >> only hurricanes as i've seen tropical conditions. >> i begin as a news reporter. in 1971 in richmond, virginia. >> this is your mean, mean weather machine. ready for a weather forecast. let's go! >> i'm on the top of washington observatory this part of new zealand is called -- >> i have found myself involved in cove
. that is why we are successful on the one amendment on political science. >> greta: did any -- >> everything that we are doing is totally out of control because nobody is watching the american taxpayer's dollar. >> greta: there is something fundamental. not they disagree but they don't want you to be successful on this amendment? >> no. it's because all these programs have constituents, they may not agree but they want the money spent because somebody is going to call up, why didn't i get my granted? or why didn't we get to travel here? we're cowards when it comes to saying no which is what every family has to say when they have limited budget. they can't do the lower priority things. let get rid of low priority things and let's do some things that the spring break guys and people coming to washington ought to not to have sacrifice over. >> greta: and day long hammer for $640,000. another six or seven weeks of tours. >> coming up, brace yourself. we finally have some agreement between republican and democratic lawmakers on healthcare. we have bipartisanship. are you happy? well, you probably
shows and science fiction. we are talking about the bionic eye. but what was once fiction is now fact. we are going to talk to the doctor giving sight to the blind with his unbelievable cutting-edge technology. we're here! we're going to the park! [ gina ] oh hey, dan! i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's gointo want one. let's get a jetta. [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. >>> you may recalled '70s television series
they said they wanted to give. libraries, exiewrpt labs, science labs, beautiful building. they're being sent to a school that is much, much older, not in good shape, and not really equipped to handle the children with special needs. >> announcer: let me ask you the same question i asked him about whether and to what extent chicago is failing its student today. where do you see the failure and where do you see the cost? >> i mean, i don't understand the-- what we're talking about when we're talking about fail. we have been failing poor and minority children across this country. it's not just chicago. it's everywhere. and the issue is we don't want to have honest conversations about poverty because doing these other things and focusing the conversation somewhere else allows people to not talk about the other issues. so in the poorer parts ofÑi tow, children have not had access to good things, and then all of a sudden, we're starting to see that happen. almost every single school that is on the bubble here, we've seen a lot of resources put in lately. but some, not so much at all. so the
like the material girl. [laughter] i go to school for nursing some go to premed or sciences but don't you feel it makes sense to learn basic human anatomy that is thessential to a medical profession or even if you study biology? >> you are going into use surgery if you are fresh out of medical school or the bears watching 20 years? i would take the nurse. there is background and knowledge that is handy absolutely but the idea that mes from the classroom should be changed and we should spend more time being practical in the real world. >> that makes sense but if you don't have the background knowledge and you just know what you'd do by experiencing these firsthand that means you don't know how to fix your mistakes because he did and get the basic technical knowledge at school. >> my challenge is is the best way to sit in the classroom paying exorbitant amounts of money or could we get back more efficiently? john: ne person. >> ideas graduated from school in indiana but is the engineering degree in human studie just as valid? it is not the same thing where does that misconception come
of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the world responded as best it could. what we did, the naval maritime forces, we sent our balts group down there which was patroling the area, we sent the hospital ship comfort down. so you have the comfort on the east coast, you have the mercy on the west coast. the mercy is parked down in san diego. it just got back from its asian humanitarian assistance from guam, indonesia, vietnam, an amazing number of nations we're partnering with. those hospital ships with 1,000 beds, 12 operating rooms, they produce their o
is experimenting with is a program that dhs science and technology created and if you are ready to write it down, you can look online, you can google it, it's called the next generation incident command system or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 7,
of science and certainly at work on mass coney center expansion the early work on the warriors a marine eye and so many iconic projects in both northeastern and fortunately and southern california and wells fargo such an integral institution and part of of the fabric of our society and vaginal foalgee president the bay area region together encompassing this whole wide region for wells far going and we are soon going to hear from tim quinn written economist from wells far go and going to get some insight from him and a major focus and this says so much about the strength of our economy and the economy is small business lending and really promising news and 2012 wells far go expended scene billion dollars in that now loan commitments to small businesses across the united states over 30% in 2011 and that is great news so thank you wells fargo and many thanks to our partners in associations who always help us in promote things event it takes a villages to market deimagine. >> joseph markenson, md: and new president and c o oavment bob electric sway and president and c o e dennis callahan and ex
and steam skills. science, frontpage, engineering, arts and math. those are the key skill sets. and i had a chance to meet with all of our san francisco chancellor and is i see chancellor here today from -- state and he joined me with chancellor helm man from uc s f city college our own public schools superintendentent to form a major education leadership counsel to advise me in making sure that the skill sets that we need in the jobs in the future are being trained and reflected in the education curriculum and how to support not only the institutions, but all of the different programs that we can use to lift up all of the educational stands for our youth i have person learn adopted 12 middle schools in san francisco to make sure each principal gets what they need to campus to support teachers effort on campus to raise the educational needs of the schools. middle school is the biggest challenge with truancy and educational challenges and we know that while we are increasing the performance stand of the whole cities one of the highest increases in the whole state is happening here in the
to be mindful of those science. with good thank you all. i look forward to working with you for a long, long time. with that being said, this hearing is concluded. >> next week the supreme court hears oral argument on two same sex marriage cases. the first tuesday on the counsel alty of california's proposition 8. a 2008 ballot initiative amending the state's constitution to recognize marriage as only between a man and woman. en wednesday a case on the constitutionality on doma. you can listen to these on tuesday and wednesday evening at 8:00 eastern on c-span. >> to believe in something that is so right, so dear, so necessary, you have to get in trouble. before we got in trouble, we studied. we didn't wake up one morning and say we're going to go is it in. we didn't just dream we're going to come to washington to washington and go on a freedom rite or we were going to march. we studied. we prepared ourselves. >> they say black power. they intimidated so many people, white people in particular by using that phrase black power. because when they use that word plaque power it made many people
. thank you. >>> a common seasoning is killing people. the new science it draws the link to more than 2 million deaths in more than one year. >> also ahead a baby shot and killed while sitting in his stroller. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>> police in georgia have arrested two teenagers suspected in the shooting death of a 14 -month-old baby. a woman told police two men approached her and demanded money. she told police when she said she didn't have any they shot her in her leg and shot and killed her son in his stroller. police picked up two teenagers after they canvassed school records and community. >>> officials say a marine fatally shot and male and female colleague last night before he killed himself in a barracks room. the three marines were part of the staff at the officer candidate school. >> as we take care of our marines and their families that are dealing with this tragedy, i would also ask for the sup
on a building at a new mission bay campus. the mission hall global health and clinical sciences building is scheduled to open next year. they will operate at the women, children and cancer. >>> the 4,200 long tunnels will allow cars to zip by. once the tunnels are open the old portion of the highway will be converted to a park for hiking and biking. >>> bay area weekend is here. it's going to be a nice one. today's temperatures will warm up a couple of degrees. 45 in napa, it's kind of chilly. a little chilly when you get going. i don't think you'll see any frost if you're a golfer. i do know that we'll see more 70s tomorrow than we saw today. the yellow represents 70-degree temperatures so greens are 60s. so lots of mid- and upper 60s tomorrow with low 70s shows up in the north and east bay valleys. no fog to talk about. tonight looks like a windy day. we'll dial in your temperatures for sunday and in the five day forecast there's some rain coming it's actually in there so we'll set that up as well. we'll so you back here at 10:45. >> it's graduation day for dozens of police recruits
-sex or heterosexual. >> there's no rigorous science that supports that conclusion. all of the science we have shows that mothering and fathering are distinct phenomenon and children do best with a married biological mother and father. it's american citizens and their elected representatives who should be voting, not five or nine unelected judges. >> hillary clinton came out in support of same-sex marriage, the former secretary of state, 2008 presidential candidate had backed civil unions but never made a full endorsement for marriage. she said it's about equality. listen. >> gay rights are human rights and human rights are gay rights. the united states should be a leader in defending those rights. >> do you think this is a move to influence the supreme court like the american academy of pediatrics trying to get their opinions out there before the courts decide. >> what you see from hillary clinton, american academy of pediatrics, and others this is an issue that is in front of the american people the way it never has been and a lots of folks want to make sure their position is clear. you've seen mo
likely your sweet sports car. >> you got to love the button. it looks like a science fiction movie set in here. >>> with 30 inches of concrete protection and generators enough to power a small city it's practical too, murphy says. >> reporter: for those in need of decking out a doomsday pad, the vivos group -- >> we'll get here. >> reporter: -- turned bunkers like this into survivalist shelters like this. the type he envisions, priced to move at just $500,000. >> the ideal buyer will be somebody not faint of heart or light of wallet. >> i don't know. it might cost another half a million dollars to renovate that thing. >> if i won the lottery i might be doing something else with the money. over to ginger zee for another look at the weather. she said she had more bad news. >> i sure do. smile and make it better. i have something first that was cool. did you see it last night? a meteor in the sky from d.c. to philadelphia, reports were coming in. there it is from delaware. so that's through and social media was going nuts. if you got them, please do send them to me at twitter or facebook.
breast cancer. i got to tell you, this is a thinly veiled scare tactic based on junk science that was largely debunked by the national cancer institute in 2003. they concluded having an abortion or miscarriage does not increase a woman's subsequent risk of developing breast cancer. a very different bill on tuesday by republican legislators in texas includes the same loose interpretation of the truth. and on paper it's about protecting the health and safety of patients of an abortion facility. but in practice it would shut down the 37 licensed abortion clinics. the law would require them to close or undergo expensive and extensive facility upgrades to meet the same standards as a surgery center. but it includes clinics in texas that don't perform any surgical procedures at all. it looks like they are choosing to give women's history month a new meaning with these historic restrictions on women's rights. but the aggressive taking away of our rights is a long game in play here. and the goal is nothing less than the complete erosion of productive choice. at the table, nancy north
a conference, the annual conference of the american political science association, which even now -- certainly then is very austere and trickish and boring event, and we try to. it up a little bit. we had a lot of good ideas. none of which i will mention until the cameras are shut off. [laughter] and i want to say, it was adjust lot of fun to work with ben. when i told them when the ideas were it, it will improve your -- [inaudible] [laughter] so ben has a point of view about how to save the world because the world is in a kind of planet, as we know it, and our country as we know it, is in big trouble. and those troubles include the ecological crisis that we hear about all the time and go about our daily life just as we did before, as if there will be a tomorrow and a tomorrow and tomorrow but there might not be. those troubles include widening spiraling inequality. they include the erosion of the infrastructure of democratic governance but the structure of living together that means the infrastructure of transportation and utilities, the networks that we depend upon as well as the governing s
ago the national institute of science reported that for every $1 spent on $1 spent on various mitigation efforts we can save four dollars in costs. we must assure that mitigation policies are thoroughly incorporated in this effort. this is especially important if climate change drives the sea levels to rise and increases the severity of coastal storms. by working to get there we can rebuild and become stronger. by protecting ourselves from pitch for big by protecting ourselves from future storms. we cannot ignore what many experts believe is the under, it is the underlying cause. -- believe is the underlying cause of hurricane sandy. be making a mistake if we did not also think about what we need to do to address the symptoms of climate change but the core problem itself. i look forward to working with all of you in the obama administration on this critical task we have before us. i will turn it over for comments. >> let me apologize. i have to go to the ford to object to the lack of amendments that are being made available on the continuing resolution. i will not be able to h
's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ it was the best day ♪ ♪ it was the best day yeah! ♪ it was the best day ♪ because of you [sigh] [echoing] we make a great pair. huh? progressive and the great outdoors -- we make a great pair. right, totally, uh... that's what i was thinking. covering the things that make the outdoors great. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> infrastructure is one of the best things we can do to boost the economy. it creates short-term jobs. over the long-term, better roads, railways, ports, electrical grids, broadband. they invite businesses to operate more efficiently. they save them money, they create jobs. if you're a regular viewer of this show, you probably saw me go underground in new york city last summer to get a closeup look at one of the biggest public works projects in american history. i'm talking about manhattan's second avenue subway line. completing it will cost around $22 billion. what's behind the mammoth tab? here's what i found out when i traveled underground. >> reporter: backhoe exka varieties, man lift
: susan estridge is a professor of law and political science at the university of southern california. i hate to laugh at the minority leader's comments, but one of the finest days for the senate in recent -- for those of us who don't speak washingtonian what, is voterama? what is that? >> you know, it's a washington phrase for how you take votes without running into a filibuster possibility. so everybody can vote, but the republicans in this case don't have to decide when we fill buster and when we don't. so you play this game. it's a nonbinding resolution, as you know. so it's not even like this is the real budget. this is the senate's toss over the wall. you know, i can only say, if student government at usc worked like this, we would all be up in arms and say, can't these kids figure out how to make a decision? i think that both sides of the aisle just look a little bit silly. >> rick: i think you're absolutely right. in the end, the thing gets passed, but at the same time, nobody thinks for a minute that it's going to become law. the whole thing is a charade. >> right. so they all g
. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> interesting. >> he was one of our best agents. >> i have to say, is this the same guy that was removed from the president's detail after the accident -- >> right. right. right. >> how do we know we can trust him? >> he is ex-special forces. ranger battalion. he will move mountains or die trying. i know him. >> back with me now, gerard butler, his co-star angela bassett and antoine fuqua. how are you now? great movie. great action-packed escapism from start to finish. just what i need on a wet tuesday afternoon as it was when i watched it. angela, what's it like working with this guy? in the movie your character is director of the cia and installed all her trust in gerard butler. >> yeah. i would agree with you. i go in there and i claim to be the woman for the job, thank you very much, but it was great. i think we shot it pretty much in order, the first scene, first scene was the first day. >> yeah, that's right. >> there has never been
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. barrow island has got rare kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> good evening, everyone. a big night for breaking news and stories you won't see anywhere else. breaking news in colorado's prison chief. there is new evidence tonight linking a man killed in texas after a shootout with the killing in colorado. >>> vice president biden says rifles like this are of no legitimate purpose off the battlefield. tonight, why someone called them indispensable. >>> later, criminals inside her home all alone hiding inside her closet. tonight, one brave teenager tells us how she kept it together. >> new pictures showing just how close one of the texas lawmen came to dying at the hands of that suspect. that's a bul
most of them have, if journalism and the social science surveys are reporting what's actually going on out there. >> yeah, and i think that there has to be a change. i think most americans have to recognize that the folks who run our enterprises, they had to learn how to do that. and we can all learn how to do that. it's the old argument in a sense that comes out of our history. >> here's a viewer named jeff chiming in. "dr. wolff, can you please give a concrete, not academic or theoretical explanation, of how you would apply your employee-run business model to a mcdonald's, wal-mart, a hospital or jpmorgan chase?" >> well, the answer is best given not as a hypothetical but to describe an enterprise which is large like all of those are, which has done this. >> there's a film called "shift change," about the cooperative efforts. and we'll provide a link to that. >> well, the example i'm going to give is a company in spain. it's called mondragon, the mondragon cooperative corporation. and a little history may interest folks. it was started in the middle of the 1950s by a catholic prie
. >> even though it's not functional anymore, you got to love the buttons. it looks like a science fiction movie set in here. >> reporter: with 30 inches of concrete protection and generators strong enough to power a small city, murphy says it's practical too. >> reporter: and for those in need of decking out a doomsday pad, specialized developers like the vivos group -- >> we'll get here. >> reporter: -- turned bunkers like this into luxurious survivalist shelters like this. the type of makeover murphy envisions for this shelter that terrorized to move at just $500,000. >> the ideal buyer is going to be somebody not faint of heart or light of wallet. >> reporter: for "good morning america," john schriffen, abc news, new york. >> i don't know. it might cost another half a million dollars to renovate that thing. there's a lot of work that needs to be done. >> if i won the lottery, i might be doing something else with the money. over to ginger zee for another look at the weather. she said she had more bad news for us. we're look forward to that, ginger. >> i sure do. >> she says with a smile
including adding 70 libraries, science labs, even air conditioning. for many it's not what's gained but what's lost and where. neighborhood schools in some of chicago's poorest communities. the decisions were based on low enrollment but others say race made a role. an outraged carrie austin, an alderman, told "the chicago tribune," quote, every time the whites go to screaming and hollering, they back off and steam roll over black and brown folks. not this time. and she's not the only one who believes that. you think it's the black communities that often are asked to sacrifice first? >> in this case, yes, i do. yes, i do. >> reporter: this is 70th street in the heart of the city's south side and this is the local elementary school. parents are proud of it. the sign up there would bear that out. soaring to new heights. all of which would be very good if it wasn't slated to be closed. and what is going to happen? >> i really don't know. i don't know what's going to happen. >> reporter: parents also fear chicago's notorious gang problems as kids cross into strange neighborhoods to attend new sch
will allow major investments in surviving schools including adding 70 libraries, science labs and even air-conditioning. for many it's not what's gained but what's lost and where. neighborhood schools in some of chicago's poorest communities. school officials say it was based on low enrollments, but others say race played a role. an alderman told the "chicago tribune," every time the whites get to scheming and hollering, they back off and steam roll. not this time. she's
an expansion of engineering and science education, talks about reducing the deficit by eliminate willing waste. how concerned should the gop be about mark sanford's ability to win in the palmetto state now? >> i think they should be very concerned. she is a very impressive candidate in her own right. take away who her brother might or might nop not be or is. take away the baggage that mark sanford has, she is an impressive candidate on her own. an important point to make. that being said, it is likely that sanford will have challenges with women voters in a general election. newt gingrich won the primary. >> what are you trying to imply about our state? >> any time we predict what voters can do they go and do the exact opposite. >> especially in south carolina. >> exactly. no question. my point is even with all the things we are talking about, a tough race for sanford, she is such a strong candidate answered does have real baggage to deal w >> katon, you were quoted in politico, it looks to me like governor sanford has a tough hill to climb, not getting 40% have to convince people who didn't v
-effective and we all agree that they should be cost-effective. it should be base upon best available science and benefit low-income and middle-class families. i think we could all agree, i would hope, on the amendment that i would offer and i would hope we would do that and allow the environmental protection agency to carry out its critical mission on behalf of the people of this country. mr. inhofe: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: madam president, i'd like to ask one question of the author and then make a comment. first of all, this does not authorize the e.p.a. to regulate in any way. this sets the standards; is that correct? mr. cardin: the senator is correct. mr. inhofe: okay. madam president, i support this amendment. i suggest that we voice vote it. the presiding officer: if there's no further debate, all those in favor say aye. all those opposed, nay. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. mrs. murray: move to reconsider. mr. leahy: move to table. the presiding officer: without objection. there are now t
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